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Credit Card Transaction Record Laundering

The Credit Card Transaction Record Laundering crime in the state of Texas gives police the right to arrest you if they believe you engage in making false credit card transactions. Learn more detailed information about the Credit Card Transaction Record Laundering offense below.

Have you been charged with Credit Card Transaction Record Laundering? Call criminal lawyer Paul Saputo at (888) 239-9305.

Credit Card Transaction Record Laundering is classified in the Texas Penal Code under Title 7 “Offenses Against Property,” Chapter 32 “Fraud.”

What is the law in Texas about Credit Card Transaction Record Laundering?

The offense is described in Section 32.35 of the Texas Penal Code.

(b) A person commits an offense if the person is an authorized vendor who, with intent to defraud the creditor or cardholder, presents to a creditor, for payment, a credit card transaction record of a sale that was not made by the authorized vendor or the vendor’s agent.

(c) A person commits an offense if, without the creditor’s authorization, the person employs, solicits, or otherwise causes an authorized vendor or the vendor’s agent to present to a creditor, for payment, a credit card transaction record of a sale that was not made by the authorized vendor or the vendor’s agent.

How can I be charged with Credit Card Transaction Record Laundering?

You can be charged with Credit Card Transaction Record Laundering if the state’s attorneys believe that each of the elements of 32.35 as described in the section above have been met.

What is the punishment for Credit Card Transaction Record Laundering?

The punishment for a conviction for Credit Card Transaction Record Laundering ranges from a Class C misdemeanor to a first degree felony, depending on the amount of the record of the sale.1


Legal References:

1Texas Penal Code Section 32.35(e)

(e) An offense under this section is a:

(1) Class C misdemeanor if the amount of the record of a sale is less than $100;

(2) Class B misdemeanor if the amount of the record of a sale is $100 or more but less than $750;

(3) Class A misdemeanor if the amount of the record of a sale is $750 or more but less than $2,500;

(4) state jail felony if the amount of the record of a sale is $2,500 or more but less than $30,000;

(5) felony of the third degree if the amount of the record of a sale is $30,000 or more but less than $150,000;

(6) felony of the second degree if the amount of the record of a sale is $150,000 or more but less than $300,000; or

(7) felony of the first degree if the amount of the record of a sale is $300,000 or more.

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